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B2B Marketing Spotlight: Omar Al-Sinjari, Sr Digital Marketing Manager, RelayHealth McKesson #B2BSMX

This may be of some interest.

Omar Al-Sinjari

Omar Al-Sinjari

Next week’s B2B Sales and Marketing Exchange conference in Boston is coming up fast! To give you another sneak peek at the talented brand marketers sharing their insights and best practices, I’ve interviewed Omar Al-Sinjari, Senior Manager, Digital Marketing at RelayHealth – McKesson.

Omar is responsible for all things digital and a full stack operator including ABM, web, analytics, attribution, lead generation and marketing operations.

RelayHealth is a business unit of McKesson which is a $214 billion Fortune 10 company. Large enterprise level organizations bring with them a different set of marketing challenges and opportunities and with all of the evolution in B2B marketing and sales that has emerged, Omar is a great person to give us perspective.

At B2BSMX Omar will be on a panel (How To Do ABM At The Enterprise Level And Scale) Tuesday August 13th at 2pm. If you’re thinking of attending B2BSMX, there’s a 25% off discount code at the end of the interview.

Lee Odden: You’ve had a long history of working in the healthcare industry. Please share a bit about your background and current role as Senior Manager, Digital Marketing at RelayHealth – McKesson.

Omar Al-Sinjari InterviewOmar Al-Sinjari: Throughout my whole career I have either Marketed to or worked in the healthcare industry. I have been involved in Digital Marketing for the last 11 years, first at a very small company, sending out emails and redesigning/managing a website.

As my career progressed, I slowly became the SME regarding digital at each one of my jobs, which evolved into my passion for all things digital marketing.

Currently at RelayHealth – McKesson, I am responsible for all things digital. I currently own the digital strategy and execution including: Marketing Operations, Analytics, Attribution, ABM, Intent, SEO and Web Presence.

Lee Odden: You’ve accomplished a lot in your time with McKesson. What is the secret to success working in marketing at such a large organization?

When embarking on a digital transformation or any marketing change, you have to have thick skin and be willing to collaborate. @omaralsinjari

Omar Al-Sinjari: Collaboration, thick skin, openness to change and patience.

When embarking on a digital transformation or any marketing change, you have to have thick skin and be willing to collaborate. In my role at Corporate McKesson, I created a cross business unit group called Marketing Operations Leadership Council (MOLC) which brought together Marketing Ops leaders and practitioners across McKesson. This was an opportunity to collaborate, share best practices and make decisions across a huge Corporation.

Change doesn’t happen overnight and educating the business on why you are trying to change is imperative along with taken a data driven approach and assessing what the business needs are.

Lee Odden: Today’s B2B marketing is a cornucopia of tactics from ABM to content marketing to influencer marketing, what advice can you share about how can B2B marketers find focus and make the right decisions on their tactical mix?

Omar Al-Sinjari: Partner with sales and customer success (account management) to better understand the customer.

From an ABM perspective you need to find out who to target and why. Ask the following questions:

  • Which accounts are best for expansion?
  • Which accounts have been difficult to target?
  • Who do you target?
  • What is their title?
  • Who are the people involved in the buying process?

Lee Odden: At B2BSMX you will be participating on a panel about ABM at the enterprise level. What are some of the top challenges with ABM at a large company?

Omar Al-Sinjari: In my role with RelayHealth, which is a business unit within McKesson, my ABM efforts are mainly focused at my business unit (BU) level. But I have shared some of my best ABM success with the other BUs and created a strategy and a playbook that can be used across the organization.

The great thing about ABM is, it’s account based, so you need to target multiple people within an organization, not just one single person or one single lead. @omaralsinjari

Some of the biggest challenges with ABM are determining who the target market is: Who within the organization you want to target. Also understanding why. One of the hardest things with ABM is determining who you can target and why you want to target those folks because different people are involved in different stages of the buying cycle. The great thing about ABM is, it’s account based, so you need to target multiple people within an organization, not just one single person or one single lead. Understanding that distinction allows you to be successful.

Lee Odden: ABM has gained quite a bit of momentum in the B2B marketing world over the last few years. Do you believe it’s helped with bring sales and marketing together?

Omar Al-Sinjari: I think everyone has been account-based at some point in terms of knowing who you are going to target and why. So ABM and ABM platforms have put some technology behind those efforts and help facilitate the conversation between sales marketing.

ABM allows you to educate sales teams and the customer success teams because it’s not just a marketing and sales conversation. @omaralsinjari

I think the concept of ABM enables marketers to talk to sales folks about who we need to target and why, instead of just saying, “Who are your top accounts?”.

The term ABM allows you to educate sales teams and the customer success teams because it’s not just a marketing and sales conversation. In my opinion, it needs to be a sales, account management, customer success and marketing conversation. Then start trickling that throughout the rest of the organization as well.

An ABM platform enables those conversations and allows you to provide data and understanding, like what are the interactions and how many interactions are you having. ABM platforms then enable you to build a marketing attribution model based on those interactions.

Lee Odden: You’re talking about bringing data together, ABM and ABM technology enabling conversations that happen between sales, account management, customer success and marketing and so forth. That’s a much bigger and coordinated effort than you often find in campaign based marketing and traditional demand gen type programs, isn’t it?

Omar Al-Sinjari: Oh yeah, for sure. It’s not just batch and blast. I think previously a lot of marketers would try to figure out who their target accounts were, then go buy a list and just start sending them a bunch of emails.

What ABM and using an ABM platform allows you to do is to stay top of mind in their short term memory. @omaralsinjari

Marketing has evolved and I don’t think people want to be marketed to that way anymore. I’m not even sure if people want to be shown display ads or targeted that way.

What ABM and using an ABM platform allows you to do is to stay top of mind in their short term memory. A buyer might have seen a solution two years ago, a solution they weren’t quite ready to buy right away. Then a few years down the line, they remember that ad or that brand or that message and how it will allow you to solve one of your B2B problems.

Lee Odden: With your experience with ABM, I’m wondering what best practices you can share for other enterprise level B2B marketers?

Omar Al-Sinjari: Partnering and evangelizing ABM with sales and customer success as well as taking a data-driven approach to how you market from an ABM perspective.

If you do have some sort of insight tool on your website that tells you a company’s IP address, that could be a source of data saying that a company is interested or they’re poking around our website. Or, if you’re seeing multiple people from one company come into your website, that’s giving you an indicator that people are interested. Then you add those folks to your ABM targets.

Partnering with the rest of the organization and educating the organization and getting people on board is especially important.

ABM is not just about net new customers, it’s also how you churn your base and expand accounts, especially as your company has new acquisitions, new solutions or new products. @omaralsinjari

How you expand within those accounts is important and ABM is a great tool to stay top of mind.

When someone buys your solution, you could end up interacting with 10 or 15 different people, whether they are from procurement, security and risk, to the actual person that’s going to be implementing. Understanding that there’s not just one person and that you need to target an account as a whole is essential.

Best practice ABM is about finding all of the people that are involved in the process, plus that one person evangelizing your solution that you’re trying to sell. @omaralsinjari

There are some situations where there are multiple stakeholders and the person that’s signing the agreement might not even be involved in the buying process until the end. So, best practice ABM is about finding all of the people that are involved in the process, plus that one person evangelizing your solution that you’re trying to sell. That evangelist will be one of your key targets, but understanding the customer as a whole picture is important.

Lee Odden: Do you have an ABM success story that you could share either one of your own or, or even something you’ve observed out in the industry?

Omar Al-Sinjari: We’ve experienced a significant, 40% growth within one of our segments year over year. That’s by targeting folks in one specific vertical and focusing on some key customers.

You can look at a company like Terminus and see how much growth they’ve had implementing ABM. ABM is B2B marketing now. It’s understanding and showing success and using data to drive decision making. Ultimately, what it all comes down to is, how are you attributing interactions to the bottom line?

Lee Odden: What are some of the top B2B marketing trends that you think are worth paying attention to in the coming year?

Omar Al-Sinjari: ABM, marketing attribution, and CDP or customer data platforms.

I don’t know how many companies are listed on the Martech list now, but I think at some point there’s going to be some sort of consolidation there.

If I had a crystal ball, I’d love to see what will be coming up from a technology standpoint and how people consume information from a B2B perspective. For example, understanding different stages according to where the buyer is in their journey and being able to use some sort of AI technology to identify and show trends across the buying cycle. Also, understanding the buying cycle and then using some sort of predictive analytics or AI to get deeper into data from an overall customer lifecycle perspective.

Lee Odden: What sources of information do you rely on most to stay on top of B2B marketing?

Omar Al-Sinjari: I use a few different sources including Chief Martech by Scott Brinker and the Marketo blog. There are several newsletters that I subscribe to and I use Google Alerts to track specific topics. I also stay up to date by attending conferences and learning from other people. I really enjoy reading case studies and about new technologies out there.

I also use social media, including Linkedin and Twitter to stay abreast of what’s going on. It’s changing all the time and everyone has opinions, right?

Lee Odden: What are you most excited about upcoming B2B SMX conference in Boston?

Omar Al-Sinjari: I’m excited for the Flip My Funnel track. I’m also excited for the REVTalks and Demand Gen Summit. I’m pretty much excited for all of it.

At B2BSMX I’m looking forward to learning from others because in this industry, you’re constantly learning and you need to be able to adapt and change. @omaralsinjari

Really, I’m looking forward to learning from others because in this industry, you’re constantly learning and you need to be able to adapt and change. And I think the overall message for ABM is change. It’s changing the way you go to market, how you interact with different people in your organization and changing the narrative as it relates to marketing. Specifically, changing marketing from being a cost center to a profit center.

Lee Odden: Thank you Omar!

Be sure to follow Omar Al-Sinjari on Twitter: omaralsinjari

For information about the B2BSMX conference including agenda, speakers, workshops, mentor opportunities and more:

B2B Sales and Marketing Exchange: Boston
August 12-13, 2019
Encore Boston Harbor
GET 25% OFF using Discount Code: 25TRB
Registration//b2bsalesmarketing.exchange/registration

The post B2B Marketing Spotlight: Omar Al-Sinjari, Sr Digital Marketing Manager, RelayHealth McKesson #B2BSMX appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

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Social Media Marketing Strategy: A Modern No-Nonsense Guide

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Wondering how to create an effective social media strategy? Looking for a current, proven guide to follow? In this article, you’ll find a step-by-step plan for developing a social media marketing strategy that really works—all based on modern marketing principles. How This Social Media Marketing Strategy Works This social media marketing strategy works by mapping […]

The post Social Media Marketing Strategy: A Modern No-Nonsense Guide appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

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Content Marketing Planning: How to Build Your Editorial Calendar

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Building an Editorial Calendar

Building an Editorial Calendar

I can’t believe I got fired from the calendar factory. All I did was take a day off!

Opening today’s post up with a bit of levity felt fitting, because calendars can cause much anxiety. They bring to mind deadlines, meticulous organization, and time crunches, which are often oppressive realities for marketers with a million things on their plates.

But the truth is that you’re likely to encounter much more dread if you don’t house your content planning within a documented and strategic editorial calendar for blogging. Building out a set schedule (with a bit of flexibility) ultimately makes your life easier because it provides a guiding light, and ensures your content strategy remains cohesive and oriented around your objectives.

In other words, editorial calendars are no joke. Here’s how you can construct one that seriously drives your company’s blog (or any other content initiative) forward. 

Fortify Your Editorial Calendar in Five Steps

Whether you’ve already got a content calendar, which you hope to refine and improve, or you’re starting from scratch, these five steps will put you on track.

Step 1: Crystallize Your Objectives

The biggest issue with many content plans is that they’re aimless and wayward. When you’re figuring things out on the fly, it can be difficult to tie everything back to the same goals and desired outcomes. So the first step is to zoom out and nail down what you’re trying to achieve with the content in question. For instance, if your blog is designed to generate leads with specific audiences, are you tethering each piece on your calendar back to this outcome in some way? 

Placing objectives front-and-center is a key benefit of documenting your content strategy, and making them the underpinning of your planning will help ensure everything you publish has a purpose. 

via GIPHY

Step 2: Chart Your Pillars and Timely Focuses

With objectives clearly defined, you can formulate content pillars that will serve as the cornerstones of your editorial calendar. Also known as topic clusters, these are the general categories that all of your content will nest under. Pillars are determined by the intersection of what you want to be known for, and where demand exists. They should be informed by SEO research around keywords and queries, hitting the sweet spot between search volume, expertise, and buying intent.

Here on the TopRank Marketing Blog, our pillars are aligned with our agency’s core services — content marketing, SEO, influencer marketing — and so pretty much everything we create for the blog approaches these topics from various angles for people who are interested in learning about them and looking for insight.

Don’t view content pillars as restricting; there are a wide range of ways you can address almost any topic, either directly or tangentially. Organizing your calendar around them will help ensure you stay focused, and relevant to your target audience. In addition to identifying a topical mix, you can start to define your content types — how-tos, thought leadership, influencer collaborations, conversion-driven pieces, etc. These can be aligned with various stages of the buying cycle, and mapped back to the key objectives established in Step 1.

At this point, it’s also smart to map out industry events or seasonal milestones that you’ll want to create content around. 

[bctt tweet=”Don’t view content pillars as restricting; there are a wide range of ways you can address almost any topic, either directly or tangentially. @NickNelsonMN #ContentMarketing #ContentPlanning” username=”toprank”]

Step 3: Coordinate with Your Broader Strategy

This is a vital consideration that is all too frequently overlooked. Whatever channel you’re scheduling content for — be it a blog, email, social, etc. — think about ways you can coordinate with other departments or disciplines in the organization. For example, does your sales team experience higher volumes of inquiries at certain times of year? Or are they attending a trade show next month that you could support with content? Maybe one of your executives will be speaking at a conference, and you want to queue up some thought leadership around the subject of their talk in the days leading up.

A strong editorial calendar should reflect the company holistically. In this sense, it can be helpful to make your calendar visible to everyone and not just the folks on your team. 

[bctt tweet=”A strong editorial calendar should reflect the company holistically. @NickNelsonMN #ContentMarketing #ContentPlanning ” username=”toprank”]

Step 4: Plot Your Cadence and Schedule Out Your Content

How often will you create content? And why? We all know it’s valuable to publish regularly, because this is how you build an invested and trusting audience, but “regularly” can mean different things under different circumstances. Is it daily? Three times a week? Multiple times per day? This decision shouldn’t driven by guesswork, but by data. 

Although it’s a little older now, HubSpot has a helpful post on determining how often companies should blog based on variables like company size and B2B vs. B2C. But you’ll also want to dig into your own visitor behavior analytics and draw conclusions on what your audience wants. Test different cadences and compare the impacts. As a general rule, more publishing equals more traffic, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’ll be worth your while to create new content each day. 

As Alfred Lua of Buffer writes: “I would recommend experimenting and finding a suitable editorial cadence based on your content goals and the amount of time you have. There is no one right editorial cadence. HubSpot publishes several articles a day while Backlinko publishes less than once a month.” (As a side note, we highlighted Backlinko’s quality-over-quantity approach here earlier this year.)

Having made this decision, you can start filling out the calendar appropriately, using your content pillars and organizational directives as guides. Plan as far out as you’re comfortable (at least one month, but forecasting three or more months is even better). Make sure you’re building in enough topical variety to keep things fresh and diverse. Once you get your schedule documented, it becomes easy to spot gaps or overloads. 

Step 5: Leave Room for Change

Note that you don’t want to completely fill out your editorial calendar. As we mentioned earlier, it’s important to leave some flexibility so you can nimbly address timely matters as they arise and account for the (expected) unexpected. Contently editor-in-chief Jordan Teicher proposes a 75/25 rule, wherein one out of every four slots in your calendar is left blank. 

“In my years managing the site, I’m certain of one thing: s*** happens,” Teicher writes. “People miss deadlines. Sources don’t respond in time. The design team can’t find the right image. My day gets stuffed with meetings, which prevents me from editing a draft. A flexible content calendar is about more than just coming up with ideas for the current news cycle. It’s also about realistic expectations.”

Smart Practices for Getting the Most Out of Your Editorial Calendar

The five steps above will help you solidify your calendar. Here are a few additional tips to help make the process smoother and more effective.

  • Hold group brainstorming sessions. Usually, the toughest thing about building out a content calendar is coming up with enough concepts to fill it in. I recommend setting up a time where a bunch of your creatives come together to load up the pipeline with ideas (run these ideas past your content pillars and SEO research to assess strategic viability). Make sure to incorporate voices from various departments. 
  • Slice up and repurpose. It’s always valuable to get the most mileage possible out of your content. If you’ve got a big, meaty blog post planned on a certain subject, why not divvy it up into three parts and run it as a series? If you’re looking for a reliable performer next month, why not take your most successful piece from last month and flip it into an infographic, or conceive a follow-up post that expands on it? Repurposing is a great way to get the most out of your content leftovers.
  • Lean on the right tools. For some content teams, a spreadsheet or even a Word doc can be sufficient for organizing your editorial calendar. In other cases, this initiative can be run through your project management software. But for high-volume teams with many elements to track and account for, it might be helpful to go with a dedicated content-centric solution. There are plenty of them out there, including Contently, DivvyHQ, Kapost, CoSchedule, and more.
  • Create comprehensive coverage. What this looks like can vary in different scenarios. It might mean approaching your topical pillars with best-answer content that addresses every subtopic your customers are interested in learning about (especially those queries carrying any level of purchase intent). If you’re in a crowded niche, it might mean gobbling up every bit of white space your competitors are missing. If your content is oriented toward B2B buyers, it might mean creating content for every role on distributed buying committees, and speaking to each stage of a lengthy purchase cycle

Right on Schedule

If you feel apprehensive about building an editorial calendar from scratch, you’re not alone. It can feel intimidating to schedule out so far in advance, and to consistently manage and maintain this resource. But I assure you, once you get into the groove, your life will be much easier and your results will improve. 

Following the steps and recommendations above will help you stay on target and derive maximum value from your efforts.

Want to add further efficiency and foresight to your strategy? Learn more about getting ahead with your content planning

The post Content Marketing Planning: How to Build Your Editorial Calendar appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

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6 Cannes Revelations About B2B Marketing in 2020

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City of Cannes Aerial view Image

City of Cannes Aerial view Image

In June the 2019 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity brought together some of the world’s savviest B2B marketers, brands, and other creative professionals.

From Nike, IKEA, and Visa to Tommy Hilfiger, Microsoft and Target, strong brands and the marketers behind them were involved at Cannes, and the trends they gathered to explore will play a part in shaping how B2B marketers focus their efforts in the months and years ahead.

Here’s a run-down of some of the top B2B marketing and other revelations from this year’s Cannes, and what they’ll mean for your business in 2020 and beyond.

1 — Cannes B2B Marketing Brand Engagement Take-Aways

Brand Engagement Gear Cogs Image

One running theme at Cannes this year was centered around being mindful of your brand’s purpose, and how it will be especially important when it comes time to meet your audience’s needs and make the greatest impact.

Being a change-maker brand comes from honing in on consumer desires, so listen to the signals coming from the online platforms where your customers and potential clients spend the majority of their time.

Don’t entirely eschew machine learning when it comes to your data, but build brand trust by ensuring that appropriate and responsible humans have data oversight.

Look to feed off competitive momentum and focus conversations and cultural discussions using creativity, and keep it sincere when it comes to brand activism, while avoiding all hints of opportunism, many at Cannes urged.

Brand engagement, especially through influencer marketing, has been the focus of several recent articles we’ve published, including these:

2 — Cannes B2B Marketing Consumer Journey Take-Aways

Happy people and dog jumping together on the sunset beach Image

Dig in and embrace the sometimes-messy digital world where your potential customers interact, by communicating with them and taking the time to learn about their lives through what they’re posting online, because cold and impersonal data can only get you so far in the customer journey.

These raw and real connections can unite and forge new relationships in ways that polished marketing campaigns sometimes just can’t, and some of the winners at Cannes showed examples of building these types of connections.

Build strong brand value while also allowing customers to take the wheel, nurture the connections your brand makes, and don’t be afraid to build strong creative partnerships in your efforts.

Valuing the participation of consumers while also standing by your brand’s values were among the trends explored during Cannes this year.

Search taking place from smart speakers and other connected voice-assisted is poised to boom in the coming years, and podcasting is expanding to offer new ways to integrate brand messaging.

Strive to build a seamless voice search approach that meshes with the values and messaging of your brand or that of your client, as sound is the newest frontier for B2B marketers.

We’re written about smart search recently, including in these helpful articles:

[bctt tweet=”“We’re very good at doing marketing on screens. We’re not as good at audio only.” — Bessie Lee, Founder and CEO, Withinlink” username=”toprank”]

3 — Cannes B2B Marketing Diversity Take-Aways

Colorful diverse finger prints image.

Cannes made efforts to find and highlight the areas in marketing where diversity continues to be lacking, led by people over 50 and those who are differently-abled, and spent considerable time exploring how setting aside fear and risk can lead to huge economic and strategic opportunities.

Going beyond hiring, diversity should move towards being more of a core piece of a brand’s values, some of those gathered at Cannes noted.

Adding diversity key performance indicators (KPIs) to existing performance metrics would go a long way towards making inclusiveness an important part of opportunity pipelines, and ultimately bottom lines, it was noted during Cannes.

4 — Cannes B2B Marketing Long-Term Planning Take-Aways

Mountain hiker with map at guideposts.

Connections coming from unexpected places and new experiences are poised to change how B2B marketers expand beyond traditional sources, and an emphasis on the power of creativity to strengthen organizations was made at Cannes.

Brands and how they reflect culture at large will become more of a joint initiative at successful firms and in strong marketing efforts, especially in creative campaigns.

Cannes showed that creativity will likely thrive in the coming year, even more-so when it’s increasingly expressed as a team effort, done in what some gathered for the week called real-time branding, with all involved having a creative stake in new marketing initiatives.

Having a relevant and flexible B2B marketing strategy, and building innovative creative methods whether working solo or with an agency, were also take-aways from Cannes this year.

We’ve explored both long-term planning and the question of when is the right time to partner with an agency, in recent articles such as these:

[bctt tweet=”“The value of agency creative is $10 Billion.” — Jay Pattisall, Forrester @jaypattisall” username=”toprank”]

5 — Cannes B2B Marketing Storytelling Take-Aways

Share Your Story image.

At Cannes a more transformational flavor of storytelling was seen as coming down the pike, one that will help evolve the narrative with more levels of both client and customer experience, all combining to bring better communication to consumers.

Rapidly-expanding digital technologies and more data than ever present challenges, but also massive opportunities, especially when the two combine to help creative storytelling efforts that help drive B2B marketing efforts.

Creating compelling narratives and delivering them in new and relevant ways will play a factor in marketing in 2020 and beyond, and firms utilizing solely technology to overcome marketing barriers may be left behind.

Learning to better recognize the people behind the data and the numbers was also seen as a key trend at Cannes, along with greater incorporation of empathy and intuition in marketing processes.

Neuroaesthetics and an evolving method of storytelling that is always-on will expand on traditional forms of narratives that have been largely limited to a beginning, middle, and end.

Micro-storytelling efforts will also help brands shows that they are listening, and encourage consumers to create and share their own stories.

A few of our helpful looks at storytelling in marketing are these:

6 — Cannes Trust in B2B Marketing Take-Aways

Hand turning trust dial image.

We’ve focused more than ever on trust in marketing over the past year at TopRank Marketing, with pieces such as these:

At Cannes the power of trust played a major role this year, and how to regain it using transparency, authenticity, and empathy, after being compromised over the past several years in the eyes of many.

A theme that resonated throughout the week was that nothing secures a relationship as powerfully as trust, which is the cornerstone of any long-term partnership.

Trust in platforms and technology were also at the forefront on Cannes this year, and admonitions to shift to marketing strategies that are more real, open, transparent, and true were common themes for rebuilding broken trust.

[bctt tweet=”As the old adage goes: Trust is gained in drops and lost in buckets. #B2BMarketing #trust” username=”toprank”]

Building on Marketing Lessons From Cannes

via GIPHY

These six major theme take-aways in the areas of brand engagement, customer journeys, diversity, long-term planning, storytelling and trust from this year’s Cannes can play a part in your own B2B marketing strategy as we head ever-closer to 2020.

You can also learn more by joining us at upcoming speaking events and conferences. Our CEO Lee Odden will be speaking at Content Marketing World this fall, where on September 3 he’ll be presenting “How to Develop a B2B Influencer Marketing Program That Actually Works” with Amisha Gandhi of SAP, and a solo session on September 4 exploring “Content Marketing Fitness – 10 Exercises to Build Your Marketing Beach Body.”

Our Senior Director of Digital Strategy Ashley Zeckman will also be speaking at Content Marketing World, in “Guardians of Content Vol 1: How to Scale B2B Influencer Content to Save the Galaxy.”

The post 6 Cannes Revelations About B2B Marketing in 2020 appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

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Ubersuggest 4.0: The Ultimate Content Marketing Tool

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content ideas

Why do you do keyword research?

It’s to find more lucrative keywords to rank for on Google, right?

But once you find these keywords, you still have to figure out how to rank for them.

For that reason, I decided to update Ubersuggest because I wanted to show you what kind of content to create and even how to promote it.

That way you can start ranking for these newly found keywords.

Here’s what’s new…

Content ideas

The way you rank for a keyword is by creating content around it. I know content isn’t king anymore and that’s because there are over 1 billion blogs on the web. That means Google can be really picky about what they decide to rank.

So now, not only do you need to write amazing content, but you also have to promote it if you want to do well.

To help you with this I created a Content Ideas report in Ubersuggest. So whenever you do keyword research, you’ll see an overview that looks like this:

overview

Just like before, you’ll see a graph at the top with the search volume over time, some keyword recommendations and, at the very bottom, a list of blog posts that performed exceptionally well for that keyword.

When you click on “content ideas” in the navigational menu or you click on “view all content ideas,” you’ll then be taken to a page that looks something like this:

content ideas

This page shows you all of the popular blog posts that have been written related to the keyword or phrase you searched.

The list is ordered by social shares, so the posts with the highest social shares are at the top. At the bottom, you can keep clicking to see more results. Even if your screen only shows 1 or 2 pages, just keep clicking next and you’ll start to see results for pages 3, 4, 5, etc.

We only show you 20 results per page, but each key phrase will typically have hundreds, if not thousands, of results as our database has over 500,000,000 blog posts from around the world.

And because there are so many results, we’ve also created an easy to use filtering system so you can fine-tune your search by including certain keywords or excluding other ones and even putting minimum and maximum thresholds on social shares.

filters

My favorite part about the content ideas report

I know you can do similar things with Buzzsumo and other tools, but this is why I created the Content Ideas report.

As I mentioned earlier, content isn’t king. You not only have to write amazing content (that’s why I sort the content by social shares as more shares typically mean people love it), but you also have to promote it.

You’ll notice that there are two other columns in this report that make the tool unique… one is “Estimated Visits” and the other is “Backlinks”.

headings

Estimated visits will show you how many visits the blog post generated from Google each month. Just click on “Keywords” and it will even show you the keywords that drive those visits and the position the article ranks for each of those terms.

keywords

Backlinks, on the other hand, are all of the referring domains that point to each article. So if 12 unique domains link to that blog post, then you’ll see the number “12” in that column. All you have to do is click on “links” and you’ll see the full list of backlinks.

links

Not only do I provide a thorough list of backlinks, but I also show you the overall page score, domain score, anchor text, and even the type of link.

The reasons I made the Content Ideas report like this are:

  1. By creating content similar to posts that have a lot of social shares, it increases the chances that the content you are writing is going to do well as people have already shown interest in that topic and even shared it on the social web.
  2. By showing you the keywords a blog post ranks for, you’ll know what keywords to focus on when writing the content. This way your post can rank as well.
  3. By showing you who links to your competition, you can now hit up everyone who links to competing articles and ask them to link to your piece of content.

Less fluff and more data

In addition to the Content Ideas report, you’ll now find that Ubersuggest provides you with more data and less fluff when you perform a keyword query.

For example, if you search for the term “dog food,” it will tell you that the average result that ranks in the top 10 has 72 backlinks and a domain score of 82.

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This way, if you want to rank for that term or any other term, you’ll have a rough idea of what you need from an authority and backlink standpoint to achieve a spot on page one.

Conclusion

If you are going to create content or write a blog post, you should check out the Content Ideas report each time before you write.

The last thing you want to do is create content that people don’t care about reading. And this report will give you good feedback so that way you aren’t wasting your time creating content that doesn’t generate social shares, backlinks, or rankings.

You’ll also notice that some posts do extremely well from a social sharing standpoint but terrible from a backlink and a search traffic perspective.

Social shares will bring you more short-term traffic and search engines bring you less traffic upfront, but more consistent traffic over time.

This report will help you find a balance so that you can get both short-term traffic and consistent traffic over the long-haul.

So, head on over and try the new Content Ideas report.

What do you think about the content ideas report?

The post Ubersuggest 4.0: The Ultimate Content Marketing Tool appeared first on Neil Patel.

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5 digital marketing courses on sale for Memorial Day weekend

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TwitterFacebook

Digital marketing is one of the most sought-after, valued skills today. Period. (No disrespect to all the coders out there, of course.)

That’s because online marketing is now the lifeblood of any enterprise. Any stores — even brick-and-mortar ones — need an online presence to compete in today’s fast-paced economy. And if you’re in the business of making a living through content generation, then you already know how essential it is to drive traffic to your blog or webpage.

Forget trolling forums or scouring random online courses on YouTube: we’ve compiled five quality pieces of training offering key instruction on today’s most essential digital marketing skills. All the featured training bundles are already marked down, but you can use code WEEKEND60 to get an additional 60% off the sale price. Read more…

More about Social Media, Digital Marketing, Online Learning, Mashable Shopping, and Tech

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Digital Marketing News: Content Pet Peeves, Facebook’s New Look, Personalization With AI & More

This may be of some interest.

What’s Most Annoying About Brand Content? Consumers Weigh In

Adobe’s* 2019 Brand Content Survey asked 1,000 consumers what they found the most annoying in brand content. The results showed that wordy content or poorly written content takes the cake with 39% of the vote. It’s also important to note that lack of personalization and too much personalization are both annoying pain points for consumers. Adobe

Video Is the Fastest Growing Type of Content on LinkedIn and Starts the Most Conversations

LinkedIn* posted a new infographic this week sharing the most surprising statistics about the platform. For example, the number of messages sent on the platform has increased 35% year over year. Plus, millions of LinkedIn members have already created video on the platform, making it the fastest growing type of content on the site. Their statistics also show that video starts the most conversations, making it a great engagement tool. LinkedIn

Nearly 75% of U.S. Internet Users Say the Cambridge Analytica Scandal Raised Privacy Concerns

Text messaging marketing company, SlickText, conducted a survey to evaluate how consumers view their privacy online after the Cambridge Analytica scandal. They found that almost three quarters of consumers were more concerned about how their information was used online after the scandal. In addition, only 32% of respondents said they’re willing to trade their personal information for greater convenience. SlickText

Facebook Is Rolling Out a Redesigned Interface

At Facebook’s F8 developer conference, CEO Mark Zuckerburg announced a design overhaul for all of their applications, including saying goodbye to their traditional blue color. The new look also rearranges the home page to focus on stories and groups—something digital marketers will want to adapt to. Facebook

Artificial Intelligence Is Being Used for Personalization at Scale

A new study from Arm Treasure Data* and Forbes Insights revealed that 25% of companies are using artificial intelligence (AI) to achieve personalization at scale—and they see AI as a critical component to their personalization efforts. The study also found that 40% of respondents are seeing an increase in sales and profits thanks to personalization. Forbes Insights and Arm Treasure Data

Engaging with Followers Is the Biggest Challenge for B2B Brands on Instagram

Social Media Today hosted a Q&A session over Twitter to discover top challenges and tips for B2B brands on Instagram. Respondents highlighted engagement as a top challenge and goal on the platform. Respondents also advised other B2B digital marketers to stay true to their brand and company culture as a top Instagram tip. Social Media Today

Creative Commons Launches New Search Engine

Finding relevant, copyright-free images for your digital marketing needs just got a whole lot easier. Creative Commons just launched CC Search, a new search engine for over 300 million Creative Commons images and 19 different collections. PetaPixel

More Than Half of Organizations Could Redirect Investments Towards Customer Experience Innovations

For more signs that experience is how brands compete today and in the future, a new article from CMO.com predicts over half of all organizations will reallocate budget for experience innovations and management. To navigate this new business landscape, CMO.com recommends a single, real-time customer profile and technology that makes it possible. CMO.com

The Benefit of Experiential Marketing

Almost 75% of people who take part in a brand’s experiential marketing are more likely to purchase something from that brand. Compared to other marketing types like video, content, and audio, experiential marketing lead to greater satisfaction, engagement, and entertainment levels among participants. ClickZ

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE:

Tom Fishburne Comic

Every digital marketer’s favorite cartoonist, Tom Fishburne, highlights the pitfalls of creative review. Marketoonist

Bringing down the bots—bot fraud losses will be down 11% this year compared to 2017. MediaPost

How seriously should digital marketers take artificial intelligence? Hint: the answer is serious. The Drum

TOPRANK MARKETING & CLIENTS IN THE NEWS:

  • Lee Odden — Solving the Experience Economy Equation — SAP (client)
  • Lee Odden — What’s Trending: No Endgame in Sight for Video Marketing — LinkedIn (client)
  • Lee Odden — How to Create Winning Co-Marketing Partnerships — Heidi Cohen
  • Debbie Friez — Connecting Ideas and People With Dell Influencers — Katana Logic

THAT’S ALL, FOLKS

From Facebook’s design overhaul to the creativity-draining review process, there were a lot of newsworthy topics to cover in digital marketing this week.

Thanks for joining us and we hope you’ll come back again next week for more of the most relevant digital marketing industry news. In the meantime, you can follow us at @toprank on Twitter for daily news stories and updates. Also, don’t miss the full video summary on our TopRank Marketing TV YouTube Channel.

*Disclosure: Arm Treasure Data, LinkedIn, and Adobe are TopRank Marketing clients

The post Digital Marketing News: Content Pet Peeves, Facebook’s New Look, Personalization With AI & More appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

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Twitter Marketing in 2019: The Ultimate Guide

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Whether pop-culture, local or global news, work, or the brands I use and wear, Twitter is a powerful social networking tool and search engine in which I can typically find the latest information about virtually any topic. This also includes updates from the companies and businesses I care about.

Businesses, like HubSpot, are able to market on Twitter to engage users and followers, increase brand awareness, boost conversions, and more (we’ll discuss the “more” shortly). Twitter makes it easy to distribute content. And, there are over 326 million average monthly Twitter users globally for you to share that content with.

The thought of reaching hundreds of millions of leads through a free social media platform sounds intriguing, right? But how do you actually ensure you’re generating fantastic content those people will want to interact with?

In this guide, we’ll answer that question along with some others including what a Twitter marketing strategy is, how you can use Twitter for your business, and what tips and tricks you can implement to help you improve your marketing efforts on the platform.

Let’s get started.

What is a Twitter marketing strategy?

A Twitter marketing strategy is a plan centered around creating, publishing, and distributing content for your buyer personas, audience, and followers through the social media platform. The goal of this type of strategy is to attract new followers and leads, boost conversions, improve brand recognition, and increase sales.

Creating a Twitter marketing strategy will require you to follow the same steps you would if you were creating any other social media marketing strategy.

  1. Research your buyer personas and audience
  2. Create unique and engaging content
  3. Organize a schedule for your posts
  4. Analyze your impact and results

So, you might be wondering what makes Twitter unique. Why would you want to actually invest the time in creating a profile and content for the platform?

Click here to access a free Twitter for Businesses kit.

What makes Twitter unique?

Twitter is a great marketing tool for a number of reasons. The platform …

… is free to use.

… allows you to share and promote branded content in seconds.

… expands your reach.

… allows you to provide quick customer service and support.

… works as a search engine tool for you to search for your competitors and their marketing content to see which tactics they’re using.

… can be used as a search engine tool for prospects to find and learn about your company.

… allows you to converse with your followers, share the latest updates about your company, and address your audience.

Now that we’ve reviewed what a Twitter marketing strategy is and what makes the platform unique, let’s cover the ways in which you can use Twitter for your business. These tips will help you boost conversions, create lasting relationships with your followers, and improve your brand awareness.

As you begin using Twitter for your business, there are some steps you’ll want to take to ensure you reach your target audience. Depending on your goals, company size, and industry, you may or may not choose to work through each of the following steps (or you may have already completed some of them), so tailor them to your needs.

Learn how to use Twitter for business to better share, engage, and market on the platform.

1. Customize and brand your profile.

When someone looks at your company’s Twitter profile, you want them to automatically know it’s yours. Meaning you should customize and brand your Twitter profile with your logo, colors, and any other recognizable and memorable details you want to incorporate. There are a few locations in which you can customize your profile.

  • Handle: Your Twitter handle is your username (for example, our handle is @hubspot) — this should include your company’s name so your followers, customers, and fans can easily search and find you on the platform. You create your Twitter handle when you sign up for an account.
  • Header: The header on your Twitter profile is your background image. You might choose to create a unique image for your header, use your logo, or another branded image.
  • Profile picture: Your Twitter profile picture represents your company’s every move, interaction, post, and tweet on the platform. It’s the image that sits above your bio and might include a picture of your logo, company’s initials, or CEO.
  • Bio: A Twitter bio provides everyone who visits your profile with a brief synopsis of what they’re about to see in 160 characters or less. It might include your mission statement, a blurb about what your company does, or something humorous and engaging.
  • Website URL: Beneath your profile picture and bio, there’s a location where you can include your URL to direct traffic straight to your website.
  • Birthday: In the same location as your URL, you can insert your company’s birthday — or the day when the company was founded — so your audience gets to know your business on a more personal level.

Twitter-profileSource

2. Create Twitter Lists.

A Twitter List — which any user has the ability to create and view — is an organized group of Twitter accounts you’ve selected and put together in specific categories. For example, at HubSpot, lists include Leadership Experts, Top Marketing Experts, Top Business Podcasters, and more. When you open a Twitter List, you only see tweets posted by the accounts on the list.

Twitter Lists are great if you want to follow only specific accounts. You might segment your lists into groups such as business inspiration, competitors, and target audience so you’re able to easily review their posts, interactions, and content.

Twitter-lists

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3. Host a Twitter Chat.

You can schedule and host a Twitter chat to engage your followers, discuss a topic, create a sense of community, and ask your audience for their opinions or input on something you’re working on.

To host a Twitter Chat (or TweetChat), you’ll need to choose a topic, set a time and date for the chat to occur, and create a hashtag for the chat. You can share this information with your followers in a tweet, on your website, in your Twitter bio, and wherever else you choose.

Everyone who wants to participate in the Twitter Chat should then be able to view all responses, questions, and comments regarding your topic of choice by searching your unique hashtag, as well as sharing their own comments and thoughts by adding the hashtag to their tweets.

Twitter Chats promote interaction and engagement on your profile and get people talking about your brand. It also creates a more personal experience between your audience members and your business.

Twitter-chat

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4. Advertise on Twitter.

Advertising through Twitter is a great way to reach your audience. This will make your tweets easily discoverable by thousands of people, helping you increase your influence and following. You can do this through promoted tweets or Twitter Ads.

Promoted Tweets

Promoted tweets make your tweets appear in the Twitter streams or Twitter search results of specific users. This is a great option for anyone looking to get more people on a specific webpage. Your business will pay a monthly fee as long as you’re promoting a tweet.

Twitter will put your promoted tweets in a daily campaign targeting the type of audience you want to reach as previously indicated in your settings. All Twitter users have the ability to interact and engage with Twitter Ads the same way they would with your organic content.

Twitter Ads

Twitter Ads is a great option if you’re using different types of tweets to achieve one goal for your business. It’s ideal if you’re looking to grow your base of followers and brand awareness significantly through the platform.

Your business can decide between different objectives when it comes to your Twitter ads including app installs, video views, and website conversions, as well as audience targeting for your campaigns. This decision will impact the price you’ll need to pay to run your ad.

5. Drive traffic to your website.

Twitter can help you direct traffic to your website — there are a number of ways to include your website’s URL on your profile as well as add links to your web pages and blogs in your tweets. Here are some ways you can use the platform to direct traffic to your website to help you increase your conversions and sales.

  • Add your website URL beneath your bio on your Twitter profile.
  • Incorporate links to your website in your tweets.
  • Retweet any content that includes direct links to your website and/ or blogs other people have shared.  
  • Embed tweets on your website with a Twitter Timeline.
  • Set up Twitter Ads to drive users to a specific landing page on your site.

6. Use Twitter Moments.

Twitter Moments are collections of tweets about a specific topic or event. They’re like a “best of” collection of tweets regarding your topic of choice. For example, Twitter’s Moments section includes “Today”, “News”, “Entertainment”, and “Fun.”

Twitter-moments

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You can also create your own section of Moments for your followers to view on your profile.  

Hubspot-twitter-moments

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You might organize your Twitter Moments into groups of tweets to help you market your business’ events and campaigns or related industry news. They also help with your marketing tactics by providing your business with an engaging way to promote the discussion of specific topics and/ or events that matter to your company to help you share your brand image with audience members.   

7. Get verified on Twitter.

You might choose to apply to get your Twitter profile verified depending on the size of your company and your industry. Twitter states they typically only accept requests for account verification if you’re in “music, acting, fashion, government, politics, religion, journalism, media, sports, business, and other key interest areas.” If Twitter accepts your application and verifies your profile, a badge with a blue checkmark inside of it will appear next to your handle. This symbolizes an authentic account.

get-verified-on-twitter

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Being verified prevents your audience members from following and being confused by impersonator accounts or accounts with similar content, usernames, and handles to yours. A verified account also makes your business look more legitimate and trustworthy.

8. Focus on building your follower count.

Needless to say, the more Twitter followers you have, the more people there are looking at and interacting with your content. You’ll have a better chance to improve brand awareness and direct more traffic to your website when you build your follower count on Twitter.

Learn how to get more Twitter followers, fast.

There are a number of ways you can increase your follower count on Twitter — here are some to get you started:

  • Ensure your content is shareable.
  • Use unique hashtags.
  • Create engaging content (giveaways, contests, questions, surveys).
  • Enlist the help of Twitter (social media) influencers.
  • Include links to your Twitter profile on your website.
  • Interact with your current followers and retweet their content so they’re more likely to do the same for you.

Now that we’ve reviewed how to use Twitter for business, let’s cover some tips and tricks you can apply to your profile to improve your marketing efforts on the platform.

The following Twitter marketing tips are universal, meaning they’re applicable to any type of business, in every industry..

1.  Use keyword targeting in your Twitter Ads.

Keyword targeting on Twitter is component of Twitter Ads. Keyword targeting allows you to engage Twitter users through the different words and phrases you’ve included in your content and they’ve searched for on the platform. This means you’re able to reach your target audience at the exact time your business, content, and services are most relevant to them.

On Twitter, there are two types of keyword targeting you can use including search and timeline.

Search Keyword Targeting

Search keyword targeting allows you to make your tweets show up for users who are searching for the topics that you determined relate to your business. For example, if you sell gluten free cookies, you can target users searching for tweets about baking, cookies, gluten intolerance, or Celiac Disease.

Timeline Keyword Targeting

Timeline keyword targeting allows you to act on users’ specific feelings, thoughts, actions, and emotions they’ve tweeted about. For example, if you’re a running gear company, you might target keywords and phrases users tweet about such as, “running a race”, “race day tips”, or “training for a marathon”.

2. Implement hashtags.

Did you know tweets with hashtags receive two-times as much engagement as tweets without them?

Adding hashtags to your tweets is a great way to expand your influence on Twitter. However, there are some guidelines you’ll want to stick to when using hashtags to ensure that you reach the largest number of people possible.

  • Create a hashtag that’s unique to your business so your followers and target audience can easily find you and your content.
  • Create relevant and memorable hashtags for other groups of tweets such as ones related to a specific campaign you’re running.
  • Use Twitter Analytics to review your most successful hashtags so you can ensure their use in future tweets.
  • Don’t overuse hashtags — this may feel and look spammy to your audience (not to mention it isn’t aesthetically pleasing). Also, tweets with more than two hashtags see a 17% decrease in engagement than those with one or two hashtags.

3. Organize a content sharing schedule.

As you grow your base of followers, you’ll need to post on a regular basis to ensure they stay engaged with your business and content. Not only do you want to tweet regularly, but you also want to tweet at the right times of the day. Here are some details about the best times (on average) for businesses to share their Twitter content:

  • Between 8–10 AM and 6–9 PM (in correlation with commuter schedules) on weekdays
  • Around noon or between 5–6 PM on any day of the week
  • For B2C companies, the best days to tweet are weekends
  • For B2B companies, the best days to tweet are weekdays

In terms of how often you should post your content on Twitter, there’s no real rule — it’s more about ensuring the content you’re sharing has a purpose and meaning. You can also review Twitter Analytics to take a deep dive into what your engagement looks like on the days you post more or less content to determine what’s working well for your specific audience.

Once you’ve determined when and how often you’re going to post your content, you can enlist the help of a social media management tool. This will allow you to both create your tweets and schedule them in advance so you can focus on other tasks you have to complete.

Here are a few examples of popular social media scheduling tools you can use for your Twitter marketing strategy:

  • Sprout Social provides you with a range of features to help you reach your target audience and buyer personas through Twitter including platform analytics, engagement tools, scheduling capabilities, and details about the type of content your audience wants.
  • Twitter Analytics allows you to analyze your tweets, understand which content is helping your business grow, and learn about your followers.
  • HubSpot has a social tool which allows you to schedule posts in advance, connect directly with your audience, and understand how your Twitter interactions are helping your business’ bottom line.

4. Create a Twitter campaign.

Social media marketing campaigns of any kind are a great way to reach your audience, drive sales, and increase your website traffic. You can create a social media marketing campaign specifically for Twitter to target users and increase your base of followers all while raising your brand awareness through the platform.

To create a Twitter marketing campaign, you’ll want to follow the same steps you would with any type of social media marketing campaign.

  1. Research your competition
  2. Determine how you’ll appeal to your target audience
  3. Choose the type of content you’ll create
  4. Share and promote your content
  5. Analyze your results

5. Write a strong profile bio.

Writing a strong and memorable bio for your Twitter profile is crucial. This is because your Twitter bio is the first thing a profile visitor will read about your company — it’s your written introduction and should briefly explain what visitors can expect from your page and content. You only have 160 characters to do this, so choose your words wisely to ensure your bio successfully represents your brand and reflects who you are as a company.

6. Use images and videos.

When possible, try to include quality videos and photos in your tweets. It’s been proven that tweets with images outperform tweets strictly made of text. Photos and images provide an eye-catching and engaging element in your content as Twitter users scroll through their feeds. Videos are proven to actually outperform tweets with images as well. In fact, tweets with videos are likely to get an average of six times the amount of engagement than tweets without them.

Videos and images are a great way to show your audience your product line or how to use an item you sell as well as make your content feel more personal. Plus, images and videos in tweets are proven to help you increase your engagement — and who wouldn’t want that?

7. Interact with your followers.

Remembering to engage with your followers as your business grows and Twitter follower count increases is crucial. This will help you create experiences for your followers and audience members that feel personal and keep them coming back to your profile all while fostering a sense of brand loyalty. For example, if someone retweets your post or comments on your tweet, you can “Like” that person’s interaction or even tweet back to them with a response.

8. Share media mentions.

If your business is mentioned in the media, share the article, video, URL, or image on Twitter. It’ll make your business feel more legitimate to anyone checking out your profile as well as show prospective followers how many other people already know about your company and are enjoying your products and services.

This is an exciting way to broadcast your success to your audience. It also provides you with a way to incorporate backlinks in your tweets which, when clicked, take your audience members to the original source of the mention. Meaning you’ll also drive traffic to the website of the media outlet that mentioned you, likely boosting their follower count and/ or brand recognition. This could potentially help you become mentioned, shared, or featured in one of their pieces of content again in the future.

9. Keep an eye on your competitors’ Twitter accounts.

Twitter is a great way to keep an eye on your competitors’ marketing efforts. You can follow them or simply search them to see what they’re posting. You can also view basic details about their engagement such as their number of retweets, comments, and responses. This is a simple way to see some of the Twitter marketing strategies your competitors are implementing and whether or not they’re working.

10. Focus on followers’ interests and needs when creating content.

If you want to reach your audience members and ensure your content resonates with them, you’ll need to focus on their interests and needs— whether that’s in relation to the way you share content, what you share, or how you present it.

When you meet the needs of your target audience and buyer personas, they’ll be more likely to continue to follow and interact with your company. As you study your buyer personas and target audience, you’ll be able to determine the type of content they’re likely looking for you to share. Additionally, you can always tweet questions, send out surveys, ask for feedback, or even create a Twitter Chat to get more ideas about the type of content your audience is looking for from your business and Twitter profile.

11. Promote your events.

Twitter is a great way to promote your business’ events. Similar to the way you might for a Twitter campaign, you can create a unique hashtag for various events (such as launch parties, giveaways, and contests) or schedule a variety of tweets (using one of your social media management tools) to promote any special occasion your company is hosting. This way, audience members — whether or not they’re your followers — will have the opportunity to learn about your event and get all of the details they need to sign up, be in attendance, or participate.

12. Check your direct messages regularly.

Like other social media platforms, Twitter provides users with a Direct Message inbox where they can contact you in a private message regarding any questions, concerns, or comments they have. So, be sure to check your inbox regularly as this can contribute to the type of customer service and support your business is known for, as well as the type of care you provide your followers and customers.

twitter-direct-messages

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13. Keep track of your analytics.

With all of the work you’re putting into your business’ Twitter marketing, you’ll want to ensure your efforts are successful in reaching your goals whether they’re related to directing more traffic to your website, increasing conversions, or improving brand awareness.

You can determine your Twitter marketing success in these areas (and many more) by analyzing your work. To do this, you’ll want to consider which metrics matter to you and then determine how you’re going to track them.

Which Metrics to Track on Twitter

Due to every business being unique and having different goals, you might not be interested in tracking all of the following Twitter metrics (or you might be looking to track additional metrics). However, we’ve compiled the following list of possible metrics for you to consider to get you started.

  • Engagement: Look at the number of retweets, follows, replies, favorites, and click-throughs your tweets get (including all hashtags and links they include).
  • Impressions: Review the number of times your tweets appeared on one of your audience members’ timelines (whether or not they’re actually following you).
  • Hashtags: Look at which of your hashtags are being used most frequently by your audience and followers.
  • Top tweets: Review your tweets with the most engagement.
  • Contributors: Keep up with the level of success each of your contributors — the people you give admin access to on your account — are having with their tweets so you can implement some of their tactics more regularly or remove them completely.

How to Track Twitter Analytics

There are a number of social media management tools, such as Sprout Social, HubSpot, and Hootsuite, with analytics features automatically built in. This is convenient for those of you who were already planning on choosing a management tool to assist with the scheduling of your posts. However, one of the most common analytics tools for Twitter is the one created specifically for the platform: Twitter Analytics.

Twitter Analytics

Twitter Analytics helps you understand how your content impacts your audience and the ways in which your activity on the platform can help you grow your business. The tool is free, accessible to all users, and includes information about your Twitter engagement rate, impressions, tweet activity, and information about your followers.

Depending on your business’ needs, you have the ability to incorporate Twitter Ads (if you pay for the option) data in Twitter Analytics as well. Lastly, there are a number of other third-party resources and apps you can download and use along with Twitter Analytics to take a deeper look at specific types of data such as detailed hashtag performance information or how other Twitter handles in your industry are doing.

Start Marketing on Twitter

Twitter is a powerful marketing tool and social media platform any business can take advantage of. It has the ability to help you direct more traffic to your website, improve brand awareness, engage your audience, create personal relationships with your followers and customers, boost conversions, and increase your sales. So, consider the Twitter for business tactics as well as the marketing tips and tricks mentioned above and get started sharing content on Twitter to help you grow your business today.

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20 Podcasts To Elevate Your B2B Marketing

This may be of some interest.

Woman rock climber scaling roof over water and sky image.

Woman rock climber scaling roof over water and sky image.

Gaining insight, advice, and new perspectives from top B2B marketing industry leaders is an incredible way to help scale your marketing skills and efforts to new heights. And podcasts, which are exploding in availability and popularity, can be a fantastic medium for getting access to those talented and seasoned industry leaders.

From the emerging B2B marketing trends to heartfelt stories of life’s great successes and bitter failures, there is so much we can learn by listening to people who have persevered and thrived. And lucky for you, we’ve compiled 20 of the best podcasts for B2B marketers right here.

via GIPHY

We’ve touched on podcasts a time or two here, with Senior Content Marketing Manager Josh Nite bringing you a first edition of digital marketing podcasts to consider back in 2016. Many of those podcasts have continued to evolve, making it hard not to mention them again here. But there are some new kids on the block, too.

And with adoption as a marketing medium and a learning and entertainment tool rising, we hope you’ll find something that strikes your fancy.

2019 January 11 Statistics Image

[bctt tweet=”Great stories happen to those who can tell them. — This American Life podcast host Ira Glass @iraglass” username=”toprank”]

Now let’s fast-forward to our list of 20 diverse podcasts that will provide a fascinating array of ideas and trends to expand and improve your B2B marketing efforts, presented in random order.

#1 – Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

Summary: Marketing Over Coffee explores the intersection of marketing and technology, with news, tips, and author interviews.

  • Hosts: Chris Penn and John Wall
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Influencers, Social Media Listening Tools, Heirarchical Ontology
  • Recent Guests: Brendan Kane, Samuel Monnie, Jocelyn Brown
  • Episode Length: 25 – 30 minutes

#2 – Six Pixels of Separation

Six Pixels of Separation

Summary: Six Pixels of Separation offers insights on brands, consumers, technology and our interconnected world.

  • Hosts: Mitch Joel
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Business, innovation, and the marketing landscape.
  • Recent Guests: Joseph Jaffe, Bernadette Jiwa, Ekaterina Walter
  • Episode Length: One hour

#3 – Marketing Smarts

Marketing Smarts

Summary: Marketing Smarts talks to industry leaders and authors such as Chris Brogan, Ann Handley and Gary Vaynerchuk, as well as c-suite executives from organizations including IBM, National Geographic, Dell, and the Baltimore Ravens.

Hosts: Kerry O’Shea Gorgone

  • Recent Topics on Tap: Livestreaming, Branding, and a Scientific Approach to Metrics, Measurement, and Marketing ROI
  • Recent Guests: Laura Gassner Otting, Minter Dial, Brian Fanzo
  • Episode Length: 25 – 35 minutes

#4 – Social Media Marketing Podcast

Social Media Marketing

Summary: Social Media Marketing presents success stories and expert interviews from leading social media marketing professionals.

  • Hosts: Michael Stelzner
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Facebook organic marketing, How to Avoid Distraction as a Marketer
  • Recent Guests: Mari Smith, Brian Solis, Nathan Latka
  • Episode Length: 45 minutes

#5 – Scott Stratten’s Unpodcast

Scott Stratten's Unpodcast

Summary: Scott Stratten’s Unpodcast presents real-life examples, tips and guidance from experts on human resources, marketing and branding, networking, public relations, and customer service.

#6 – Adweek’s CMO Moves

Adweek's CMO Moves

Summary: Adweek’s CMO Moves podcast offers inspiring career advice and the personal success stories behind an array of top marketing leaders.

  • Hosts: Nadine Dietz
  • Topics on Tap: How to Win as a Team, The Hunt for a Signature Move
  • Recent Guests: Emily Culp, Seth Freeman, Meredith Verdone
  • Episode Length: 30 minutes

#7 – LinkedIn Live with Marketers

LinkedIn Live with Marketers

Summary: LinkedIn Live with Marketers is a video-based series that can also be enjoyed listening to only the audio, as the LinkedIn (client) hosts tackle challenges top of mind for marketers.

  • Hosts: Jann Schwarz and others
  • Recent Topics on Tap: The Staying Power of Breakthrough Ideas, Brand Awareness vs. Lead Gen: Battle or Balance?
  • Recent Guests: Wendy Clark, Rob Norman, Peter Weinberg
  • Episode Length: One hour

#8 – Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

Summary: Lexicon Valley digs deeply into language, from pet peeves, syntax, and etymology to neurolinguistics and the death of languages.

  • Hosts: John McWhorter
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Is Social Media Changing English?, One Tongue to Rule Them All
  • Recent Guests: Deborah Tannen, Lane Greene
  • Episode Length: 40 minutes

#9 – Should This Exist?

Should This Exist?

Summary: Should This Exist? is hosted by Flickr and Hunch co-founder Caterina Fake, and explores the impact technology in all its forms has had on humanity. “We’re seeing amazing new technologies that are emerging every day that we need to have a conversation about,” Fake recently told Fast Company.

  • Hosts: Caterina Fake
  • Topics on Tap: Affectiva: Software that detects how you feel, Halo: A headset that makes you learn faster
  • Recent Guests: Neuroscientist Daniel Chao, entrepreneur and scientist Rana El-Kaliouby
  • Episode Length: 35 minutes

#10 – The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process

Summary: The Art of Process sees hosts Aimee and Ted talk to friends across the creative spectrum to explore how they work, and the process of turning ideas into art.

  • Hosts: Aimee Mann and Ted Leo
  • Recent Topics on Tap: The rise of streaming services, How to tackle a blank page
  • Recent Guests: Wyatt Cenac, Rebecca Sugar, Dan Wilson
  • Episode Length: 50 minutes

#11 – Without Fail

Without Fail

Summary: Without Fail is hosted by former This American Life contributor and NPR journalist Alex Blumberg, and takes a weekly look at someone who’s taken a big risk and either failed or found success.

  • Hosts: Alex Blumberg
  • Topics on Tap: Bringing Brands Back to Life, The Man Behind the Iconic Apple Stores: Ron Johnson
  • Recent Guests: Andrew Mason of Groupon, Sophia Amoruso of Nasty Gal and Girlboss
  • Episode Length: 50 minutes

#12 -The Marketing Book Podcast

Marketing Book Podcast

Summary: The Marketing Book Podcast fills each Friday with a new episode interviewing bestselling marketing authors.

  • Hosts: Douglas Burdett
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Marketing Flexology, Laughing @ Advertising, Questions that Sell
  • Recent Guests: Guy Kawasaki, Jay Acunzo, Mark Schaefer
  • Episode Length: 50 minutes

#13 – The BeanCast

The BeanCast

Summary: The BeanCast is a weekly exploration and roundtable discussion of advertising trends that could have an impact your brand.

  • Host: Bob Knorpp
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Marketing Ethics, Branded Podcasting, Frictionless Brands
  • Recent Guests: Jay Baer, Colin Glaum, Lisa Laporte
  • Episode Length: One hour plus

#14 – Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

Summary: Social Pros Podcast, named the best podcast at the Content Marketing Awards, provides inside looks at real people doing real social media work.

  • Hosts: Jay Baer and Adam Brown
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Why Your People Are the Secret to B2B Social Media Wins, How to Use Authenticity to Become an Iconic Business,
  • Recent Guests: Seth Godin, Rohit Bhargava, Need James
  • Episode Length: 50 – 55 minutes

#15 – The Marketing Companion Podcast

The Marketing Companion Podcast

Summary: The Marketing Companion Podcast serves up insights and ideas to boost your marketing skills. It’s billed as “always fun, always interesting, and always on-target with insights and ideas that will turn up your marketing intellect to an ’11.'”

  • Hosts: Mark Schaefer and Brooke Sellas
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Social media burn-out, Mind-bending social media trends
  • Recent Guests: Kerry Gorgone, Mitch Joel
  • Episode Length: 25 – 40 minutes

#16 – Copyblogger FM

Copyblogger FM

Summary: Copyblogger FM gets to the heart of the latest marketing tips, tactics, stories and strategies that provide acceleration for your business. Featuring a rotating lineup of analysts, this podcast covers a variety of tactical areas such as email marketing, content marketing, conversion optimization, and more.

  • Hosts: Sonia Simone
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Getting Your Big, Scary Projects Finished, The 3 Plus 1 Foundational Elements of Effective Persuasion
  • Recent Guests: Amber Naslund, Pamela Wilson, Nathan Barry
  • Episode Length: 25 minutes

#17 – Invisibilia

Invisibilia

Summary: Invisibilia joins narrative storytelling and science to make you see your own life differently, with lessons applicable to marketers.

  • Hosts: LuLu Miller, Alix Spiegel, and Hanna Rosin
  • Recent Topics on Tap: The Remote Control Brain, Who Do You Let In?
  • Recent Guests: Cord Jefferson, Max Hawkins, Renato Rosaldo
  • Episode Length: 35 – 55 minutes

#18 – The Strategy Hour

The Strategy Hour

Summary: The Strategy Hour offers actionable strategies and marketing tips for growing your business, plus in-depth interviews that go straight to the “meat and potatoes.”

  • Hosts: Abagail Pumphrey and Emylee Williams
  • Recent Topics on Tap: How to Listen to Your Audience, Why Creating Community is Crucial for Your Brand and Happiness
  • Recent Guests: Kathleen Cutler, Sarah Peck, Nikki Porcher
  • Episode Length: 35 – 40 minutes

#19 – Behind the Brilliance

Behind the Brilliance

Summary: Behind the Brilliance features “smart and funny” conversations and takes a weekly journey with leading innovators, creatives, and entrepreneurs.

  • Host: Lisa Nicole Bell
  • Topics on Tap: The link between self-awareness and success, The importance of starting small to make big changes
  • Recent Guests: Laura Vanderkam, Jonathan Jackson, Paul Jarvis
  • Episode Length: One hour plus

#20 – Women in Tech

Women in Tech

Summary: Women in Tech explores marketing and technology featuring inspiring women who are Engineers, Founders, Investors, UX and UI Designers, and Journalists.

  • Host: Espree Devora
  • Topics on Tap: Women Empowering Technologies, Building technology-driven businesses
  • Recent Guests: Kristine Kornilova, Linda Sinka, Marite Aleksandra Silava
  • Episode Length: 11 – 40 plus minutes

Lifelong Learning From B2B Marketing-Focused Podcasts

Incorporating podcasts in the world of B2B marketing can be challenging, yet the advantages they offer make a strong case for considering them in your own campaigns. And it can be done.

For example, our client 3M conducted one of the largest science studies ever focused on global attitudes about science. The resulting State of Science Index research report led to the launch of 3M’s first podcast, the Science Champions Podcast.

Hosted by 3M’s Chief Science Advocate Jayshree Seth, the first season featured 21 science experts and influencers on topics ranging from an introduction to science in everyday life to careers in the field.

3M Science Champions Podcast Image

Results: The Science Champions podcast exceeded all expectations for downloads and engagement, resulting in the launch of Season 2 in March 2019. The podcast has also created relationships with science influencers and helped to showcase internal influencers.

As another example, Dell Technologies wanted to partner with industry influencers to create useful content for customers and increase the influence of their internal experts, which led to the creation of the Dell Luminaries podcast, hosted by influencers Mark Schaefer and Doug Karr.

The podcast highlights technology visionaries from inside Dell and out, and helps put a human touch on technology innovation.

Dell Luminaries podcast image.

Results: The Dell Luminaries project built a single platform that brings voices from multiple companies under the Dell brand together.

Our CEO Lee Odden recently wrote a Digital Marketing Institute article, which featured 3M and Dell’s podcasting success along with eight other B2B companies that have had strong results from influencer marketing.

It’s Only Just Begun — What Are Your Favorites?

This list only scratches the surface of the excellent marketing-related podcasts available. If you have a favorite not listed here, please leave a comment with a podcast that inspires your B2B marketing efforts.

Considering a podcast for your B2B brand? Get the what, why, and how lowdown on B2B podcasting from our own Joshua Nite.

The post 20 Podcasts To Elevate Your B2B Marketing appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

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Is Facebook Organic Marketing Dead?

This may be of some interest.

Have recent changes to Facebook impacted your marketing? Wondering what you should and shouldn’t be doing with your organic Facebook marketing? To explore Facebook organic marketing, I interview Mari Smith. Mari is a consultant for Facebook and the leading expert on Facebook marketing. She’s also author of The New Relationship Marketing: How to Build a […]

The post Is Facebook Organic Marketing Dead? appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

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